Adding more detail to the Standard Occupational Classification

Closes 30 Sep 2019

Opened 13 Jun 2019

Overview

PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS  NOT A FORMAL PUBLIC CONSULTATION

The Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) is a recognised framework that enables all UK occupations to be classified according to skill level and specialisation. SOC is essential in the creation of occupational statistics which, in turn, are used to inform policy and the public. There are also many examples of how SOC is used outside of the statiscal environment including matching job seekers to vacancies and in the identification of skills gaps and training needs.   

Some SOC users have expressed a need for a greater level of detail than is currently available.  In response to this, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) is working with Warwick University’s Institute for Employment Research (IER) to launch a stakeholder enagagement exercise looking at the level and nature of requirements. 

For now, the remit of this work remains exploratory.  There are no plans currently to publish statistics to this more detailed level as it is unlikely there will be availability of large enough sample sizes to make the new job groups statistically viable. However, there is the possibility of this being feasible in the future. In the meantime, this project will affect the wider use of SOC outside of the statistical environment. To give just one example, a more detailed version of SOC may help enable the more precise identification skills gaps and traning needs, to promote future growth in our ever-evolving labour market.

Why We Are Consulting

PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS NOT A FORMAL PUBLIC CONSULTATION.

Your insight will play a crucial role in contributing to the development of the framework. As well as ensuring roles and responisbilities within your sector continue to be correctly represented, your insight will help us make sure the extended SOC is fit for user need. 

Audiences

  • Anyone from any background

Interests

  • Business
  • Crime
  • Economy
  • Health
  • Labour market
  • Migration
  • Population
  • Statistics
  • Data