Consultation Hub

Welcome to the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Consultation Hub. This site will help you find, share and participate in our consultations. This is your chance to help us produce better statistics for better decisions.
 
You can find details of consultations held before November 2016 on our website.

We Asked, You Said, We Did

Here are some of the issues we have consulted on and their outcomes. See all outcomes

We Asked

This is the third consecutive year that ONS has published the Economic Statistics and Analysis Strategy (ESAS) for consultation. We sought your views on our priorities for Economic Statistics in 2018/19, and to feedback if they are consistent with their requirements. We are committed to review and annually update the strategy to reflect changing needs and priorities, to give a clear prioritisation of our development of economic statistics

 

 

You Said

We received feedback from a number of organisations. Respondents were happy with the strategy highlighting priority areas for Economic Statistics.

We Did

 Number of comments were added to the draft strategy which was then published on 26 April 2018. We would like to thank all respondents for taking the time to respond to the consultation.

We Asked

We asked for your opinions on the proposed changes to certain labour market tables and related publications. In the consultation launched in February 2018 we proposed to cease publication of some supplementary labour market tables because they are either:

  • based on old pension age breakdowns
  • use variables which are known to have a low survey response rate, which can impact on the results when detailed breakdowns are produced; and/or
  • have low user demand demonstrated by the low number of downloads of these tables from the ONS website.

We also proposed to publish some supplementary labour market tables without gender breakdown and to change the source of some tables from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) to the Annual Population Survey (APS). As part of the latter proposal we will also move dissemination of these tables from the ONS website to NOMIS. The final proposal in the consultation related to changing the frequency of the Reconciliation of estimates of employment and jobs article from four times a year (March, June, September and December) to once a year (every March in order to compare estimates for the whole year).  The proposals in the consultation affected only the supplementary labour market tables, with no implications for the tables feeding into the labour market bulletin. The proposals related only to the published tables and at this stage there will be no impact on the LFS microdata used to produce these outputs.

You Said

We received some responses from a variety of organisations. We would like to thank all respondents for taking the time to respond to the consultation.

The main feedback was:

  • All respondents agreed with the proposal to cease publication of tables A03 NSA and SA: Employment, unemployment and economic inactivity for men aged from 16 to 64 and women aged from 16 to 59 if the historic series remained accessible after the discontinuation of the tables.
  • Most respondents had no concerns about ceasing the publication of the tables listed below:
  1. EMP11: Employment by socio-economic classification
  2. EMP12: Part-time and temporary workers by socio-economic classification
  3. EMP15: Job related training received by employees
  4. EARN07: Gross weekly earnings by industry
  5. EARN08: Distribution of gross hourly earnings of employees
  6. UNEM02: Unemployment by previous occupation
  7. UNEM03: Unemployment by previous industrial sector and
  8. RED02: Redundancies by industry, age, sex and re-employment rates .

However, a minority of respondents had concerns over ceasing the publication of tables:

  1. EMP11: Employment by socio-economic classification
  2. EMP12: Part-time and temporary workers by socio-economic classification
  3. EMP15: Job related training received by employees
  4. EARN07: Gross weekly earnings by industry and
  5. EARN08: Distribution of gross hourly earnings of employees.  
  • Most respondents agreed with the proposal to produce the tables below without a gender breakdown:
  1. EARN05: Gross weekly earnings of full-time employees by region and
  2. EARN06: Gross weekly earnings by occupation .
  • All of the respondents agreed in principle with the proposal to change the data source of the list of tables provided below from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) to the Annual Population Survey (APS).
  1. EMP04: All in employment by status, occupation and sex
  2. EMP08: All in employment by occupation
  3. EMP09: Employees and self-employed by occupation and
  4. EMP10: Part-time and temporary workers by occupation .
  • Most respondents agreed to the proposed change in publication frequency of the Reconciliation of estimates of employment and jobs article from four times a year (March, June, September and December) to once a year (every March in order to compare estimates for the whole year).

We Did

We reviewed the feedback provided by respondents and we are going to undertake the actions listed below:

  • We will cease the publication of the tables listed below from August 2018 onwards but we will keep the historic time series on the ONS website:
  1. A03 NSA and SA: Employment, unemployment and economic inactivity for men aged from 16 to 64 and women aged from 16 to 59
  2. EMP12: Part-time and temporary workers by socio-economic classification. Even though users had some concerns about ceasing the publication of this table they indicated that it is less vital for their work than table EMP11: Employment by socio-economic classification. This is the reason why table EMP12 is going to be discontinued.
  3. UNEM02: Unemployment by previous occupation
  4. UNEM03: Unemployment by previous industrial sector and
  5. RED02: Redundancies by industry, age, sex and re-employment rates. However, ONS will consider reinstating these tables in the future if the size of the estimates increases.
  • We will continue publishing the tables listed below as there is demonstrated user need for them:
  1. EMP11: Employment by socio-economic classification
  2. EMP15: Job related training received by employees
  3. EARN07: Gross weekly earnings by industry and
  4. EARN08: Distribution of gross hourly earnings of employees.
  • We will produce the tables listed below only at the people level from August 2018 onwards:
  1. EARN05: Gross weekly earnings of full-time employees by region and 
  2. EARN06: Gross weekly earnings by occupation.
  • We will change the data source of the list of tables provided below from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) to the Annual Population Survey (APS) and we will move dissemination from the ONS website to NOMIS. Moreover, the estimates will be available for an annual period rather than quarterly. The data on NOMIS will be in a presentational format and we will add links on the ONS website to direct users to the new data homepage. An example of a table produced on NOMIS is available. The change in the data source for these tables will take place from February 2019 onwards.
  1. EMP04: All in employment by status, occupation and sex
  2. EMP08: All in employment by occupation
  3. EMP09: Employees and self-employed by occupation and
  4. EMP10: Part-time and temporary workers by occupation.
  • We will change the publication frequency of the Reconciliation of estimates of employment and jobs article from four times a year (March, June, September and December) to once a year (every March in order to compare estimates for the whole year). This change will come into effect following the scheduled publication on 12th June 2018.

 

We Asked

We Asked

ONS currently produces Health State Life Expectancy estimates for local areas of the UK. These estimates at both national and subnational level are calculated using health state prevalence data available from the Annual Population Survey (APS). Stakeholders have wanted estimates of these summary measures of population health at a subnational level, and they are a national indicator in the Public Health Outcomes Framework.

We tested three alternative methods, designed to address the current weakness of small sample sizes producing somewhat erratic health state prevalence estimates across the age distribution in those areas with smaller populations. Each method modelled age-specific health and disability-free state prevalence using a least squares regression containing a quadratic line of best fit.

ONS wanted to ensure stakeholders had the opportunity to respond to the proposed change in methods, having had the opportunity to appraise its impact in the Proposed method change in UK health state life expectancies paper published in December 2017.

ONS wanted to elicit the opinion of key stakeholders on the proposed change, particularly regarding its complexity and ease of communication. We also asked whether other methods should be considered, whether they had any concerns with us implementing the method and whether implementation would impact on their use of these statistics.

You Said

You Said

We are grateful to everyone who took time to respond to the consultation. There were 5 responses received, but some of these were a collation from separate organisations although not all wanted to be identified. Those willing to be identified can be found in the final section of the consultation report titled ‘List of responding organisations’.

The key points to note from the responses to the consultation are:

  • Further complexity to improve the model should not be undertaken at the expense of ease of communication of the statistics. It was thought the modelling approach was already somewhat complex and shouldn’t be made more so.
  • Four respondents agreed that the method proposed to model health and disability state prevalence reduces the volatility in the estimates for sub-national areas and at the older ages, making comparisons over time easier.
  • The proposed method complexity can be simplified by explicit explanation of the changes in methodology in plain English, which will mitigate the risk of figures being misinterpreted.
  • Concerns were raised as to whether health and disability questions would be asked in the 2021 Census, and if they did, would they be comparable and would changes present challenges for using the new proposed method. Over longer time horizons, there was also a concern about the adequacy of data expected to replace the Census in 2031.
  • ONS must ensure sufficient information is available to allow other departments and organizations to calculate figures and not be reliant on ONS calculating the health state life expectancy estimates using other sources or for different population sub-groups. This will also reduce the risk of users misrepresenting figures.
  • There was a concern raised over whether the method will continue to be developed, as this would cause further breaks in the time-series. Another respondent expressed concern that the implementation of the method would put at risk a long, consistent time-series.
  • One organisation has said they will implement the method that ONS decides to use, provided sufficient information is available to allow them to replicate the estimates. The proposed changes provide data for all subnational areas which would make the data more usable for one organisation’s purposes.
  • Respondents said the health state life expectancy estimates feed into public health frameworks for England and Wales, which help understand how public health is being improved and protected. The estimates also have policy impact in that they are used in consideration of the State Pension age.

We Did

We Did

As a result of this consultation the following actions will be undertaken:

  • We will implement our proposed method based on modelling health and disability-free state prevalence to calculate future health state life expectancy estimates and provide a back series;
  • Our next publication for sub-national areas of the UK, due to be published in December 2018 will apply this method;
  • Subsequently, ONS will no longer publish statistics based on the previous method;
  • The December 2018 and March 2019 publications referred to above will also take account of the revised mid-year population estimates for sub-national and small area populations in England and Wales and provide a back series from 2009 to 2011 for the former and from 2011 to 2013 for the latter;
  • The December publication will include additional areas such as combined authorities (geographic codes E47) for England and Health Boards for Wales;
  • Facilitate further work with the devolved administrations to ensure understanding of the methodology to allow other departments to replicate the estimates and calculate their own estimates with other areas of interest;
  • We will additionally undertake an evaluation of the method’s performance, comparing the 10-year trajectory between 2010 to 2012 and 2020 to 2021 using the new method and that using the censuses to interpolate census-based prevalence over the decade;
  • ONS will ensure any changes brought about by what is learnt from the 2021 Census data will be implemented with a back series. If the 2021 Census contains health questions, ONS will wait until a formal evaluation and interpolation study has been conducted and published on. This is unlikely to be published until the late autumn of 2023.