Census 2021 outputs: content design and release phase proposals

Closes 5 Oct 2021

4b: Health and living arrangements

We’re investigating four new variables related to living arrangements and vacant addresses. These are:
  • COVID-19 health risk
  • houses in multiple occupation (HMO)
  • multigenerational households
  • living apart together

Questions on each proposal are included below.

Please provide as much detail as possible to justify your data needs. For example, what policy or planning decisions would the data analysis affect? Decisions will also take into consideration factors such as data quality and statistical disclosure control.

All proposals are at an early stage of development and we aim to further understand user needs through this consultation.  There is no guarantee that it will be possible to produce these variables, but we are keen to understand user needs better before we investigate them more fully.

 

COVID-19 health risk

We could potentially define an output based on the vaccination priority groups by using the self-reported general health status to identify at-risk groups. For example, previous research has shown that there is a strong relationship between a response of “limited a lot” to the question on how conditions limit your activities, and people being clinically extremely vulnerable

Would you use an COVID-19 health risk group variable if it were produced?
Please rank the following factors in order of importance in relation to your needs for analysis of COVID-19 health risk groups.

‘1’ is most important, and ‘4’ is least important. If a factor is not important at all, please respond ‘Not important’

Houses in Multiple Occupation (HMO)

 

The government's definition that a dwelling is an HMO if at least three tenants live there, forming more than one household, and you share toilet, bathroom or kitchen facilities with other tenants. If a dwelling meets this definition and 5 or more tenants live there, then it is a classed as a large HMO. There are different legal obligations for landlords of HMOs and large HMOs.

In 2011, we didn’t output data meeting these definitions. For 2021, we’re investigating the need for outputs to fit this definition. Initial feasibility work suggests we may need to define a HMO as having three or more unrelated people live in the household. This would help ensure we do not count multigenerational households as HMOs.

 
Would you use an HMO variable for dwellings data, if it were produced?
Is there a specific definition of HMO you require?
Do you need to be able to separately identify small and large HMOs?
Please rank the following factors in order of importance in relation to your needs for analysis of HMOs.

‘1’ is most important, and ‘3' is least important. If a factor is not important at all, please respond ‘Not important’

Multigenerational Households

A multigenerational household is defined as any household with more than two generations resident.  For example, this could be when children of any age, a parent(s) and a grandparent(s) live together. This indicator would identify households that met that definition.

Would you use a multigenerational household variable if it were produced?
If data can be produced, are there specific multigenerational household variable classifications or definitions you would require?
If data can be produced, would you require this for people or households?
Please rank the following factors in order of importance in relation to your needs for analysis of multigenerational households.

‘1’ is most important, and ‘2’ is least important. If a factor is not important at all, please respond ‘Not important’

Living Apart Together

We're investigating the feasibility of producing a variable indicating the population who live separately to their partners. The populations we could identify are:

  • those who are married or in a civil partnership but not living with the person that relationship is with
  • those who are spending 30 or more days a year at a partner’s address, whether married or in a civil partnership or not
Would you use a living apart together variable if it were produced?
Would your proposed analysis require separate data for the two groups identified?
  • Those who are married or in a civil partnership, but not living with the person that relationship is with
  • Those who are spending 30 days or more a year at a partner’s address, whether married or in a civil partnership or not
If data could be produced, would you require this to be produced for people or households?
Please rank the following factors in order of importance in relation to your needs for analysis of the population living apart together.

‘1’ is most important, and ‘2’ is least important. If a factor is not important at all, please respond ‘Not important’